The Future of Student Housing

The Future of Student Housing

By Kayla Green and Melinda Swenson

The landscape of higher education
is changing, and with it, concepts of student housing. we went back in time to check out living spaces from the 1950s, took a glance at present-day residence hall rooms, and asked CSU student Michael Bent (a former R.A.) to envision the future of housing at Colorado state university.

Future

Social

Social media continues to be a popular way of connecting and socializing. Hologram chat technology will replace some face-to-face communication. Impromptu socializing will be facilitated by the ability to replicate snacks in the room.

Design

Interior design in rooms will be generated and customizable through technology. Wall-to-wall windows may alternatively be set to privacy mode, taking the place of curtains; clear window mode, (seen here, taking in a view of the western foothills); or image mode, which transforms the wall space into artwork or a virtual landscape.

Technology

Info-center (touch-writing screen for note taking, reminders, etc.), multi- media screen, electronic white board, hologram chat technology. Room access through retina imaging, voice or fingerprint recognition.

Construction

High-rise buildings accommodate greater student populations. layout of room (shown here) has identical features at opposite end: recessed, lofted bed, drawer space, built-in desk and furniture, common living space in center. Shown also: recessed lighting, pneumatic sliding door.

Present

Social

No curfews. Today, students come and go freely using security access cards. The library provides 24/7 access to study space. Social norms have relaxed; residents are free to have friends of the opposite gender in their rooms.

Entertainment includes music and electronic gaming.
Social media has revolutionized communication. More than 1 billion people worldwide now have Google+ enabled accounts; 550 million are registered Twitter users; 20 million are active monthly users of Pinterest, and 150 million are active monthly users of Instagram.

Construction

Academic Village’s
Aspen Hall achieved LEED Gold certification
in 2010 (in recognition of its design, construction, and operation as a high- performing, sustainable building). Braiden and Parmelee Hall renovations include improved thermal performance and energy efficiency.

Design

More individualism, freedom of expression, and prosperity. Bedding ensembles, artwork, rugs, and organizational units are commonplace.

Technology

Rooms have gone from two Internet ports “per pillow”
to one, due to increased demand for a wireless
campus. Wireless connections and access to high- speed Internet throughout. Personal cell phones have replaced landlines. Brass keys replaced by smart chips in RamCards to access building and rooms. Webcams allow residents to see how long dining center lines are before heading there. Modern, electronic, programmable thermostats monitor and control inside temperatures.

Past

Social

Curfews were 10 p.m. on weekdays, 11 p.m. weekends. You were grounded (unable to leave the house after dinner) if you violated curfew.

Leisure time was filled with face-to-face communication, reading, letter writing, radio listening. Mingling with the opposite sex in bedrooms was taboo. “It just wasn’t done,” said alumna Betty Anne Husted (B.A., ’42). “In fact, if you lingered on the front porch with your date, the house mother would flick the porch light on and off.”

Design

In the ’40s and ’50s, women decorated their bedroom walls with dance cards, booklets
in which they recorded the names of partners at dances. Furniture and bedding in men’s and women’s rooms were institutional-looking. The only personal item a young woman might bring from home was a stuffed animal. Men decorated their spaces with sports mementos, trophies.

Technology

Students shared one rotary, wall phone per fraternity or sorority house. Color TV was not commonplace until 1953. If there was a black-and- white TV, it was located in the sitting room of the house.

Construction

All students were
housed in sororities or fraternities. These homes typically had sitting rooms for common areas.

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