Boettcher, baker, legacy maker

blank white spacer image

BOETTCHER, BAKER, LEGACY MAKER

TIM SCHULTZ DOES IT ALL TO HELP COLORADO, CSU THRIVE

by Becky Jensen (’93)

When Tim Schultz (B.A. Political Science, ’72) was a student at Colorado State University, the campus looked, and probably smelled, a lot different than it does today.

“I had to walk past cows and horses on my way to classes and the library,” says the former president and executive director of the Denver-based Boettcher Foundation. And as a student, that suited Schultz just fine. He always dreamed of being a cowboy, so the land-grant character of CSU made him feel like he was in the right place.

After graduating from Colorado State with a degree in political science, Schultz worked at his parents’ bakery in Grand Junction for a while, and then started ranching outside of Meeker. “I went from being a baker to saddling up a horse every day,” he says. “And I loved it.”

Setting his CSU degree in motion, Schultz ran for office in Rio Blanco County, and at age 25 became the youngest county commissioner in the state. After he was contacted by President Jimmy Carter, Schultz became the national spokesman for oil shale production during the energy crisis of the late 1970s.

Under Colorado governors Dick Lamm and Roy Romer, Schultz served in a variety of state leadership roles, including executive director of the Colorado Department of Local Affairs, chairman of the Colorado Economic Development Commission, chairman of the Colorado Wildlife Commission, and Colorado Commissioner of Agriculture.

In the early 1980s, Schultz co-founded the Denver Rustlers, a group that rallied to save the Junior Livestock Sale at the State Fair when lack of bidding threatened to shut it down. Today, the Denver Rustlers have raised nearly $3 million to help thousands of young farmers and ranchers auction their livestock to earn money for college.

FROM RUSTLERS TO BOETTCHER

It was a member of the Denver Rustlers who recommended Schultz for the executive director positon at the Boettcher Foundation, where Schultz was hired in 1995.

“Helping farm kids sell their animals led me to Boettcher, one of the top foundations in Colorado,” says Schultz.

The $300 million Boettcher Foundation, in addition to making capital grants to Colorado nonprofits, provides full-ride undergraduate scholarships, a teacher training residency, and biomedical research grants to keep and cultivate the brightest minds in Colorado. Boettcher Scholarships are among the most prestigious awards available to Colorado’s high-achieving students, and many Boettcher Scholars choose to attend CSU.

Schultz retired from Boettcher in July leaving behind a 22-year legacy of leadership. During his tenure, the foundation made 3,630 grants worth $214 million, and grew its endowment from $171 million in 1995 to $287 million in 2016 – all in the name of helping Colorado thrive.

“It’s impossible to overstate what wonderful partners Tim and the Boettcher Foundation have been for CSU – together, they have made so much possible for our campus and our students,” says CSU President Dr. Tony Frank. “While he is retiring from the Foundation, I have no doubt that Tim will continue to be connected to our campus community as one of our most loyal and passionate alums.”

Katie Kramer, a 1993 Boettcher Scholar with 20 years of experience working in all areas of the Boettcher Foundation, was named CEO in 2016 and officially succeeded Schultz as president. “One of the greatest honors I can have as a leader of an organization,” says Schultz, “is to have someone I mentored replace me.”

Retirement doesn’t mean Schultz is planning to slow down. Gov. John Hickenlooper has already appointed Schultz chair of the Colorado Creative Industries Council.

“And if Tony [Frank] would hire me,” Schultz admits with a grin, “I’d like to be the rural roving ambassador for CSU.”

BOETTCHER FOUNDATION INVESTS IN COLORADO STATE

The CSU community is continually transformed by the vision and generosity of the Boettcher Foundation – a valued partner dedicated to advancing Colorado through strategic investments in outstanding Colorado students, teachers, and research.


NEARLY $80,000 in program grants


DR. TONY FRANK Appointed to the Boettcher Foundation board in 2016


279 Boettcher Scholars have attended CSU


$1.97 MILLION in biomedical research grants awarded to 9 Boettcher Investigators


Eight Capital Grants Worth $1.575 MILLION 

Siblings Lindsey and Eric Paricio at a CSU football game

 

PARICIOS KEEP BOETTCHER SCHOLARSHIPS AND CSU ALL IN THE FAMILY

SIBLINGS LINDSEY AND ERIC Paricio are Boettcher Scholarship recipients and current CSU students. They also follow in their dad’s footsteps, Mark Paricio (’84), who received the scholarship in 1980 and graduated from CSU with a chemical engineering degree.

Earning the scholarship was a goal early on for both Lindsey, a junior majoring in chemistry, and Eric, a freshman pursuing a music education major.

WHY DID THEY CHOOSE CSU?

“I feel like I have a community at CSU,” said Lindsey. “We get great support from mentors, and each month we get to meet up and talk with other Boettcher scholarship recipients.”

“I am so grateful for my experience at CSU and to the Boettcher Foundation for the opportunities I have to go in-depth with my education,” said Eric.

THE BENEFIT OF GOING THROUGH THIS EXPERIENCE TOGETHER?

“We don’t have to go through homesickness,” Lindsey continued. “We eat dinner together and go rock climbing a couple times a week.”

– Angie Dixon (’94)

Series Navigation<< Breaking ground on ground-breaking instituteClose to the game >>