Concocting Unique Business Ventures

Concocting Unique Business Ventures

By Jeff Mccubbin, Dean, College Of Health And Human Sciences

Next time you sip a piney and floral IPA, spread creamy Brie cheese over a piece of crusty sourdough bread or savor the tangy snap of a perfect pickle, take a few moments to think about what went into that experience.

These culinary encounters aren’t an accident. All of these products and sought-after tastes are a result of fermentation – a complex scientific process that transforms simple ingredients into extraordinary and delectable foods and beverages. It’s a process of preserving food that dates back thousands of years, but it is also at the forefront of the modern food movement – think cheese, yogurt, bread, wine, pickling, and so much more – and has applications within the energy sector, too.

Today, the products of fermentation are big business – beer, wine, dairy, and baking are all multi-billion-dollar industries – and Colorado State University is well-placed at the forefront of this emerging industry sector.

We like to say that CSU covers fermentation from field to foam, with a long history of expertise in fermentation-related disciplines like chemistry, biology, crop science, food safety, engineering, and even business. Today, we’re building new programs and majors that leverage the fermentation knowledge from across our campus and combining them under the banner of our Fermentation Science and Technology program, which launched in the College of Health and Humans Sciences in 2013.

Our goal is simple – CSU wants to be the place that trains the next generation of leaders within the fast-growing fermentation science fields. We also want to be the place where industry comes for research and innovation related to fermentation.

I think you’ll find that this special Outcomes edition of CSU The Magazine tells some compelling stories about how the University is advancing the science of fermentation and helping bring those advancements to the marketplace.

Series Navigation<< New Belgium Gift Shapes The Future Of FermentationBigger than Beer >>